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Frequently Asked Questions about Time Delay
 

Question 1: How often should intervention activities occur?   >>


Question 2:  How do I make data collection more feasible?  >>


Question 3: What strategies can be used to increase the likelihood that generalization and
     maintenance will occur? >>


Question 4: Are any other evidence-based practices used in conjunction with time delay procedures? >>


1. How often should intervention activities occur?

    Structured learning activities using time delay should take place at least once per day; however, time delay can be implemented whenever team members plan for it, particularly when they embed time delay procedures within ongoing classroom or home routines and activities.

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2. How do I make data collection more feasible?

Data collection is an essential task associated with implementing time delay; however, it can seem overwhelming at times. Team members can plan for data collection in advance so that the task seems less daunting. The first step is to identify when and where data collection will occur. Generally, it should take place during the activity in which time delay is being used. It is often helpful to create a master data collection sheet that can be used during both baseline and intervention. A blank time delay data sheet can be found in the Resources section of this module. Once copies of the data collection sheet have been made, team members can place it on a clipboard with an attached pencil/pen or, if at home, on the refrigerator door. As trials are implemented, team members or parents can record the learner’s response using the clipboard on their laps. After two consecutive learning activities, team members simply divide the correct number of responses by the total number of trials to get the percentage of a learner’s correct responses (see below) to make decisions about the intervention (e.g., increase the delay, select a different controlling prompt).

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3. What strategies can be used to increase the likelihood that generalization and
     maintenance will occur?

Team members can increase the likelihood that learners with ASD will generalize the use of skills by (a) training typically developing peers or parents to implement time delay, (b) embedding time delay procedures within ongoing routines and activities, and (c) fading the use of time delay by gradually increasing the interval between the initial cue and the controlling prompt. These strategies help learners with ASD use skills independently without becoming dependent upon prompts.

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4. Are any other evidence-based practices used in conjunction with time delay procedures?

Time delay procedures are always used in conjunction with two evidence-based practices: prompting and reinforcement. Team members also might use peer-mediated instruction/intervention (PMII) as well as naturalistic teaching when implementing time delay, particularly when they are looking for additional ways to promote generalization of skills.

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